Is Primetime Still Important – You Betcha!

The Canada Media Fund (CMF) has asked me to write the occasional blog post of television issues and my first one was released today. I just want to give a little more context to why I thought it was a necessary topic – space and tone were limited there (I had to sound more pro and less convo as I do here).

If you were listening to the Rogers licence renewal hearing last week you would have heard a reminder as to why a discussion about the continued importance of prime time is important. Or if you read Andrew Coyne today, you would get another reminder. Everyone seems to think that prime time is out the door or has one foot in the doorway. The stats say otherwise.

In the Rogers licence renewal hearing, Rogers argued that they did not need to broadcast ethnic news in prime time because their audience is going digital and can pick up all their news online. They would rather air reruns of US programming in that time slot and make more money. In a unscientific but illustrative poll, Commissioner Raj Shoan asked many of the intervenors if they or their stakeholders watched Omni and particularly the ethnic news online. Very few admitted to watching online and in fact most were adamant that they and their stakeholders wanted to watch their news on broadcast and in the evening. This was what they were used to. I’m sure that this was no surprise to Rogers. Though BBM data is notoriously difficult when it comes to capturing ethnic audiences (not large enough sample sizes) they must know from feedback from their audience that the broadcast schedule is important to them. Rogers still tried to make the argument that we are in an on demand world as a way of trying to reduce regulation and increase revenues. It sounded to me like the CRTC wasn’t buying it but we’ll see.

Today’s piece by Andrew Coyne puts the on demand world a little further out at ‘a few years, maybe two’ as part of his argument that we no longer need the CBC, CanCon, the CRTC and the Broadcasting Act. His argument ignores the facts, such as those quoted in my CMF blog post, which demonstrate that tv viewing is not actually dropping. The growth of on demand, currently at least, means that we are watching more video entertainment in total given the opportunities of digital platforms. So yes, for the foreseeable future we do still need the CBC, CanCon, the CRTC and the Broadcasting Act.  And regulation that ensures that there is the choice of Canadian programming in primetime when most Canadians are watching.

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2 thoughts on “Is Primetime Still Important – You Betcha!

  1. Anonymous Coward

    The Broadcasting Act doesn’t actually obligate the CRTC to do anything at all. So if Coyne is right and the endless cornucopia is truly finally just around the corner — just as it always has been, for the slightly-removed crystal-ball-gazers who dip into our industry — then the Broadcasting Act still does not need to be changed at all. The CRTC will simply observe what is going on, and will be legally required to not do anything except sit back and let the cornucopia roll over us.

    Reply
    1. Kelly Lynne Ashton Post author

      Well, ‘Anonymous Coward’, I beg to differ. See s.5(1) of the Broadcasting Act for the CRTC’s requirement to regulate and supervise the Canadian broadcasting system and implement the broadcasting policy of the Act.

      And – the facts suggest that this endless cornucopia isn’t so close at hand as he suggests. Or rather, that the audience still wants their broadcast television AND that cornucopia.

      Reply

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